Smokeysevin roll's his own swap adventure (Critical Failure) 1987 JS550 to 750 Build - Page 3
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  1. #21
    PWCToday Regular smokeysevin's Avatar
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    Re: Smokeysevin roll's his own swap adventure (Critical Failure) 1987 JS550 to 750 Bu

    Lower Deck Prep Part 2 (Wipe Until Clean)

    I started today by cleaning up the disaster that my garage had become. Let me be honest here, it was always a disaster but I normally don't work with fiberglass so it was a different kind of disaster. Anyways, since I am getting closer to the point of being ready to run things like exhaust and cooling lines I needed to clean up the stock bedplate. Into the blast cabinet it went and 2ish hours later I had a freshly bead blasted and rust free bedplate. Houston is not a particularly dry climate but it was dry enough today that I kept getting shocked by the static buildup from my blast cabinet. It was not the best.

    Once that was done, I blasted the bedplate with 2 coats of self etching primer and then some high temp engine paint.

    Having gotten that out of the way and having postponed the inevitable long enough, I resumed sanding the bottom deck. This took approximately 4 hours when it was all said and done. I am once again reminded why I despise bodywork. In the process I used 12 80 grit sanding discs, 3 100 grit rollock discs, and 1 3X18 50 grit sanding belt but I was able to remove each of the multiple layers of paint and gelkote.

    I also removed the stock hull extensions to prep for the bilge drains, rear exhaust, sponson mounting plates, and cooling lines. I plan to build removable hull extnsions and mount plates so I can get back to stock length, stock +2" and naked length.

    Time Spent:
    7 Hours (my hands have not stopped vibrating yet...)

    Tools Used:
    3X18 Belt Sander
    90 Degree Die Grinder
    5" Orbital Sander
    1" Wood Chisel
    Stainless Steel Wire Brush
    Drill and 5/16" Drill Bit
    Shop Vac

    Materials Used:
    None today

    Layers of Paint Removed:
    6 (Seriously

    Water Consumed:
    64oz (Spring is here peeps, stay hydrated)

    PPE Used:
    Half Respirator
    Tyvek Suit
    3M Worktunes Headhones
    Hazard Frito 7mil blue bomber gloves

    Percentage of Garage Floor Epoxy Coated
    18% (running total to date, I didn't spill anything that I am aware of today)

    Percentage complete:
    50% (I am ready to start adding filler and glass now)

    Sean




    Well Seasoned Bedplate


    Beadblasted and Rattle Canned with High Heat Chemical Resistant Paint


    The Jawbreaker


    Naked SMC



    Tunnel and Transom (Sounds like a good buddy cop movie)

    The older I get, the more I find myself fixing things that I knew I was doing correctly at the time.



    1987 Kawasaki JankyStandup Build
    2004 Kawi-Doo STX-RXT-X Build
    2001 Toyota Tundra Basketcase Build


  2. #22
    PWCToday Regular smokeysevin's Avatar
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    Re: Smokeysevin roll's his own swap adventure (Critical Failure) 1987 JS550 to 750 Bu

    Quote Originally Posted by Myself View Post
    OK, you're making me actually want to start working on my Tigersaki again....

    http://www.pwctoday.com/showthread.php?t=488735
    That is a really interesting engine setup. I don't know 2-strokes all that well but the port setup on your engine is really neat. The power numbers are impressive too. How does the weight compare?

    Thanks for sharing!

    Sean

    The older I get, the more I find myself fixing things that I knew I was doing correctly at the time.



    1987 Kawasaki JankyStandup Build
    2004 Kawi-Doo STX-RXT-X Build
    2001 Toyota Tundra Basketcase Build


  3. #23
    PWCToday.com Is My Home Away From Home Myself's Avatar
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    Re: Smokeysevin roll's his own swap adventure (Critical Failure) 1987 JS550 to 750 Bu

    I'd say weight is right there with a 650 Kawi powerplant.
    http://www.facebook.com/twinlakesjetskirepair

    '89 Kawi 650SX 42.4 GPS
    +3" stock pipe, ported ex. manifold, drilled waterbox, blueprinted pump, Ocean Pro ride plate

    '99 Yama GP1200 65U 61.8 GPS
    ported cylinders, matched cases, milled head, blueprinted pump, long ride plate

    '96 Seadoo HX 717 53.13 GPS
    light porting, massaged cases, lightened flywheel, port matched manifolds, Rossier pipe, stubby pump cone

  4. #24
    PWCToday Regular smokeysevin's Avatar
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    Re: Smokeysevin roll's his own swap adventure (Critical Failure) 1987 JS550 to 750 Bu

    Lower Deck Prep Part 3 (Chine On You Crazy Diamond)

    This was a relatively quick and simple day. I took 4 of the fish sticks from a few posts ago and trimmed off the ends on the bandsaw (for freshness) then dressed them so there were no splinters. I then sanded the length with some leftover "Used" 5" 80 grit discs from yesterday and got to work taping them out. I followed the stock hull lines as much as possible and made sure the distance from the edge of the hull was the same on both sides.

    Once I was happy with where they were, I mixed up some peanut butter and smeared that down the fish sticks until I was reasonably happy with the fitup. I figure I will end up going in and trimming the end to length once it cures and then I can fill in the gaps left by the tape and do a layer of glass over the bottom.

    Time Spent:
    2 Hours (taping straight lines is not a skill I have)

    Tools Used:
    Milwaukee Portaband and Swag Table
    Porter Cable Upright Belt Sander

    Materials Used:
    4OZ Resin
    4 Scoops of Cabosil
    Painters Tape
    Sanding Disc

    "Fish Sticks" Consumed
    4

    PPE Used:
    Half Respirator
    3M Worktunes Headhones
    Hazard Frito 7mil blue bomber gloves

    Percentage of Garage Floor Epoxy Coated
    18% (running total to date, I am on a roll with this no spill thing)

    Percentage complete:
    62.5% (I am ready to start adding filler and glass now)

    Sean


    Remember when you were young


    You shone like the sun


    Chine on, you crazy diamond


    Now there's a look in your eyes


    Like black holes in the sky



    The older I get, the more I find myself fixing things that I knew I was doing correctly at the time.



    1987 Kawasaki JankyStandup Build
    2004 Kawi-Doo STX-RXT-X Build
    2001 Toyota Tundra Basketcase Build


  5. #25
    PWCToday Regular smokeysevin's Avatar
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    Re: Smokeysevin roll's his own swap adventure (Critical Failure) 1987 JS550 to 750 Bu

    Lower Deck Reinforcement Part 1 of 1 (This is probably the end, you should go to bed and stop reading here.)

    Continuing on the theme from yesterday, I once again ventured into the realm of smearing peanut butter along fish sticks. This was to fill the gaps left by my structural painters tape. Once that was complete, I applied 8oz of resin to the whole bottom deck and waited for that to setup. While that was kicking, I cut qty 3 12" wide sections of 1208 and prepared them for the bottom. I started at the back and layered them sort of like shark skin. I cut one of the 50" lengths in half and positioned that at the nose. I then cut 3 6" X 16" sections and used that to cover the gap left by the 12" wide sections and laid that up to the nose. Then the time came to raid the scrap section where I found lots of small squares and used that to fill in the nose sections and cover the old "repairs". Its not perfect but its "serviceable" and it will get covered with black gel kote so who cares.

    I ventured into the house to cure the stomach rumbles and got suckered into being a good husband so I kicked around on the couch watching terrible reality tv until I was once again saved by the catalytic miracle that is epoxy resin!

    All my pre cut pieces were placed, and smoothed until my next 20 minutes were up. The next 16oz of resin was mixed and applied to wet out the glass. I then spent another 30ish minutes making sure all the corners were tucked and the bubbles were out. All in all, I think this went okay but the cruel light of morning will reveal my inadequacies.


    Time Spent:
    4 Hours (I made a turkey sandwich, and was forced to watch the end of an episode of The Bachelor by my wife while I was waiting on the resin to kick. This alone is reason enough to use fast cure resin, learn from my mistakes!)

    Tools Used:
    Rockwell Oscillating Multi Tool
    Porter Cable 5" Orbital Sander
    Shop Vac

    Materials Used:
    24OZ Resin
    4 Scoops of Cabosil
    48" 1208
    Sanding Disc

    Reality TV watched while waiting for the resin to kick:
    The Bachelor: Women Tell All (Send help)

    PPE Used:
    Half Respirator
    Tyvek Suit
    3M Worktunes Headhones
    Hazard Frito 7mil blue bomber gloves

    Percentage of Garage Floor Epoxy Coated
    24% (That escalated quickly, I mean, this really got out of hand fast)

    Percentage complete:
    75% (Could the end be near for our ruggedly handsome hero? Tune in tomorrow for another exciting misadventure!)

    Sean


    Trimmed and Filed Fangs (I even measured the cuts)


    Smooth and Sticky




    Fully Clothed and Dry




    Like Papier-Mache, except toxic, and expensive, and water resistant
    Last edited by smokeysevin; 03-02-2020 at 11:32 PM.

    The older I get, the more I find myself fixing things that I knew I was doing correctly at the time.



    1987 Kawasaki JankyStandup Build
    2004 Kawi-Doo STX-RXT-X Build
    2001 Toyota Tundra Basketcase Build


  6. #26
    PWCToday Regular smokeysevin's Avatar
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    Re: Smokeysevin roll's his own swap adventure (Critical Failure) 1987 JS550 to 750 Bu

    Filling in the low spots Part 1 (Neunundneunzig Weiße Luftballons)


    I took a few days off from ski work, went to see Willie Nelson at Rodeo Houston (good show, poor sound quality) Replaced the header flange gaskets in my Tundra, did some gardening, where was I going with this?


    Right! Today I started by sanding the hull and knocking the unsupported edges of the bottom deck reinforcement off. Once that was blown clean and wiped with acetone, I mixed up 2 batches (8oz and 4oz) of epoxy mixed with micro-balloons to fill in the rough spots. The micro balloons are really cool, they flow differently than the cabosil when stirring and mixing them with epoxy.


    If we call cabosil peanut butter and the filler looks like marshmallow fluff then by logic the ski must be a Fluffernutter and therefor delicious.


    That bit of culinary education out of the way, I also removed the remaining squeezed out adhesive from the edge of the tubbies and stripped the remaining paint/gelkote off.


    Time Spent:
    4 Hours (this seems to be a recurring theme...)

    Tools Used:
    Rockwell Oscillating Multi Tool
    Porter Cable 5" Orbital Sander
    Shop Vac
    Box Cutter
    3/4" Chisel

    Materials Used:
    12OZ Resin
    9 Scoops of Micro Balloons
    4 80 Grit Sanding Discs

    Tunes Jammed To:
    Album: Forever in the Friendzone
    Artist: Suburban Legends
    Comments: There are some high and low notes, I recommend listening to the whole album.

    PPE Used:
    Half Respirator
    Tyvek Suit
    3M Worktunes Headhones
    2 pairs Hazard Frito 7mil blue bomber gloves

    Percentage of Garage Floor Epoxy Coated:
    26% (That may have been actual marshmallow fluff, I wasn't willing to taste it though. )

    Percentage complete:
    80% (You and I in a little E-shop, buy some microballoons with the money I got. Set them mixed in the garage of Sean, till one by one, they were on. Back again, bugs in the fill-air. Grab the tyvek and the sand-air. Sanding here, its almost time. Ninety-Nine Microballoons go by!)

    Sean


    I have no future as a body-guy or a baker


    Low spots filled, high spots glazed


    Streaky, what you look for in a high performance coating...
    Last edited by smokeysevin; 03-07-2020 at 05:51 PM.

    The older I get, the more I find myself fixing things that I knew I was doing correctly at the time.



    1987 Kawasaki JankyStandup Build
    2004 Kawi-Doo STX-RXT-X Build
    2001 Toyota Tundra Basketcase Build


  7. #27
    PWCToday Regular smokeysevin's Avatar
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    Re: Smokeysevin roll's his own swap adventure (Critical Failure) 1987 JS550 to 750 Bu

    Filling in the low spots Part 2 (THE REFIL-IN-ING)


    Dawn of the first day (48 hours remain)



    I started out yesterday by knocking back (rather aggressively) the cake icing with a combination of the belt sander and disc sander. This got rid of most of the wrinkles and left me with a reasonably smooth surface. Once that was done and mostly flat, I blasted it with some black crust-oleum paint so I could see the low spots. I gave that time to dry and retired to the parlor to consider my life choices for the remainder of the evening. Once the witching hour arrived, I drifted into a fitful slumber and arose at the dawn of a new day.


    Dawn of the second day (24 hours remain)


    Tonight I went back to the garage and attacked the hull by hand with a 2 foot section of 3" diameter SCH 40 PVC Pipe. To actually remove material, I wrapped it in a full sheet of 80 grit purple sandpaper. This was pretty effective at removing the high spots from the chines. Mostly I went back and forth along the axis of the hull, the only tricky part was getting the transition points between the chine and the center of the hull. To take care of that area, I sanded on an alternating 45 and 135 degree pattern which seems to have worked pretty well.


    To finish the hull off. I mixed up 2 batches of the micro balloons and resin, this time each was 4oz resin and 2 scoops of the filler. This mixed to a thick but still leveling consistency which I applied with a paint brush. I will be letting this setup and then repeating the sanding process tomorrow but hopefully with 150 grit to prep for a high build primer.


    SIDE NOTE: I know everyone talks about not using cheap brushes because they shed like a husky in the summertime in Houston. There is a very good reason for that, picking out brush bristles is one of the most frustrating things I have done during this build. DON'T USE CHEAP BRUSHES


    We will pick this up tomorrow to see how much more filler I need or if I just say screw it, its a JS hull and leave it as is...


    Time Spent:
    8 Hours over 2 days (Hand sanding with pvc pipe is a real workout, 3 hours of that was popping bubbles in the resin and picking lost brush hairs out of the filler...)


    Tools Used:
    Ryobi 3x18" Belt Sander
    Porter Cable 5" Orbital Sander
    Shop Vac
    2'X3" SCH 40 PVC pipe
    1/3 Sheet Sandpaper Drywall Sander Holder Thing


    Materials Used:
    8OZ Resin
    4 Scoops of Micro Balloons
    6 80 Grit Sand Paper Sheets
    2 cheap paint brushes (learn from my mistakes, heed my warning young warrior)


    Time Spent with Garage Door Open, shaking my *** back and forth while my neighbors looked on in horror:
    2 hours, you have gotta use your legs when sanding. If you don't feel the burn, you won't get them gains. Never skip leg day, even if you are truing a hull.


    PPE Used:
    Half Respirator
    Tyvek Suit
    3M Worktunes Headhones
    4 pairs Hazard Frito 7mil blue bomber gloves (Sandpaper kept ripping them)


    Percentage of Garage Floor Epoxy Coated
    26.2% (Negligible Gains due to the brush bristles coming off the damn paintbrush)


    Percentage complete:
    90% (I think I have one more round of sanding before I sling some high build filler primer on it.)


    Sean



    Always let your Rustoleum be your guide


    Sanding tool thing I used, its a plastic handle with some foam on it with clips that come loose anytime you look at it funny


    Areas where I didn't have the layup schedule flat and sanded into the CSM layer show texture, Not my best moment.



    We have established that cabosil is peanut butter, lots of microballoons are marshmallow fluff, allow me to introduce to you, doughnut glaze!


    This little guy, don't worry about that little guy...

    The older I get, the more I find myself fixing things that I knew I was doing correctly at the time.



    1987 Kawasaki JankyStandup Build
    2004 Kawi-Doo STX-RXT-X Build
    2001 Toyota Tundra Basketcase Build


  8. #28
    PWCToday Regular smokeysevin's Avatar
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    Re: Smokeysevin roll's his own swap adventure (Critical Failure) 1987 JS550 to 750 Bu


    Motor and Electronics Part 1 (A Brief Intermission from Your Regularly Scheduled Program, Don't Get Used to it)


    I will start by saying, I don't get the electronics setup on standups. That is a drastic oversimplification, but from a user and dealership perspective this setup has some really stupid "features". I cut my teeth with 4 stroke runabouts and all that stuff makes sense to me (except for seadoos, really brp?) You can pull the motor without opening any electronics up or having to hang the ecu off the motor when you go to remove it. The E-Box to me is basically a waste of space and weight. The electronics on the 4 stroke runabouts don't typically fail and when they do, its the gauges (for the most part). That being said, I plan to use that style of electronics to both simplify and add lightness on this build.

    Complaints:

    1) The entire system is interconnected without easily reachable disconnects. On the runabouts (couches) and most other vehicles the harness can be unplugged from the system without removing bolts (looking at you stator wiring)

    2) The method of sealing the E-Box relies on orb fittings made of plastic that then have to be tightened against to seal the wiring that passes through them. It works as long as the fittings are tight (but not too tight) and as long as the rubber is new.

    3) The E-Box itself contains a weird mix of sealed and unsealed electronics. The ECU itself is potted but the connections to the trim and power wires are unsealed. The fuse holder is sealed in the E box but the connections are open. The coil wires are sealed with epoxy (more or less permanently) while the starter solenoid is open.

    Proposed Solution:


    1) Since the ECU is potted and I have a ready supply of sealed connectors, I am just going to mount the stock ECU on a plate and connect the system using stock style sumitomo connectors that are commonly used on the runabouts.

    2) By swapping to an external setup, it eliminates the issue with Complaint 2, I will also be moving the coil and starter solenoid to a plate rather than a box. For the coil I will swap to the couch coil with different plug ends, for the solenoid, I will probably use one of the seadoo solenoids since they are small and sealed. Basically I will be replicating the STX-15f style electronics. This will free up lots of space and make the install much cleaner and more modern. Service should be loads easier.

    Mounts and Swap

    I finally got around to opening my first round of goodies from Rhaas Products today. From a first glance, the mounts are really well made and the adapter plate is very nicely machined. I thought the custom hardware was a nice touch for the bedplate adapter. I also placed my order for the driveline conversion today, I went with the grooved plate, standard plastic bulkhead (for now) and added the conversion bearing. My X2 Driveshaft showed up today and my 750 Pump and 650 nozzle are on the way.

    Motor

    As for the motor, I have not spent much time going over it. Externally, it is super clean. I will probably get into it tomorrow or Friday to give it a once over. Off the bat, I need both the oil pump blockoff and the crankcase drain blockoff. I will need new reed gaskets and carb gaskets, 2 carb kits, and exhaust gaskets. I plan to do a leakdown test on the engine and verify the crank seals are ok before going too far with it. Plans for now are to run it stock but freshened up.

    Time Spent:
    4 Hours (most of which was spent cleaning the cocaine sanding dust out of the work area and wheeling my shop carts around)

    Tools Used:
    Broom
    Shop Vac
    Air Blow Gun
    Box Cutter

    Materials Used:
    None

    PPE Used:
    Half Respirator
    3M Worktunes Headhones

    Percentage of Garage Floor Epoxy Coated
    22.2% (I removed some cured epoxy)

    Percentage complete:
    N/A (Taking a break from composite work to plan out where the engine and electronics are going to live)

    Sean


    Missing features? The "holes" are sealed.


    The whole ECU is potted, I have tried to removed this before on a STX-15f Ecu when I was looking into flash tools and its a royal pain. The STX ecus are sealed really well, I would not hesitate to run this out of the E-Box provided I can get a good connector installed.


    It really reminds me of a shrunken 15f Ecu which makes sense given this was probably 10 years older than when the 12f came out.


    Parts, Living on the gulf coast, well away from fresh water, I am not used to seeing older gear that is this clean.


    RHAAS PRODUCTS BABY


    The older I get, the more I find myself fixing things that I knew I was doing correctly at the time.



    1987 Kawasaki JankyStandup Build
    2004 Kawi-Doo STX-RXT-X Build
    2001 Toyota Tundra Basketcase Build


  9. #29
    PWCToday.com Is My Home Away From Home theVetteman3's Avatar
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    Re: Smokeysevin roll's his own swap adventure (Critical Failure) 1987 JS550 to 750 Bu

    Regarding the ditching of the ebox components, although interesting and I like your idea of adding lightness (I'm doing that 100000% on my 1100 SJ build), having a case containing and sealing the components is a very good idea. Even if the components themselves are sealed, it provides an extra layer of protection which might be necessary given the hugely wet and moisture-rich environment these things are in. As a proposed solution, I would recommend mounting all of the components in a sealed plastic water tight box. You can get these all over the place. And then pop holes to the exterior with sealed connections. This is what I'm running on the 1100 SJ.

    The plastic fittings, although crappy looking, actually seal quite well. You can always put dielectric grease on them or silicone for an extra layer of protection. Really the only issue is if guys aren't running leads out thru them, and then they just fill the end with silicone or whatever. I would not trust that solution, I do better ways of capping them off.

    Oh finally, when the first round of us did these 750 swap skis back in 2010/2011, a lot of us ran stand up 750/800 style ebox cases. These fit easily mounted to the stock firewall location with an adaptor plate.

    Saving weight is good and all, but in building up a good running, hard hitting ski, you need to know where to put your effort. A sealed ebox will give you no issues. What will have a much larger impact on performance is getting either that cylinder set up right, or getting an entirely different one. Just by the color, that's a big pin engine? Big pins have the highest port timing of all the 750s. Great for racing, bad for low end and (in my opinion) conversion skis. The small pin 750 ss/ xi cylinders have enough added low end over a big pin that you'll notice. The 750sx cyl has so much more that you'll be truly shocked. After that, a good pipe. (PJS EX2650, Coffmans, 650 Limited Factory Pipe).

    Having a good cylinder / pipe / good carb jetting combo can overcome an extra 20-30 lbs easily over a crappy set up.

    Also word of caution just because a bunch of builds have been running them lately, and I forget what you said you were using, do not use a stock 650 pipe. It will kill your power to the extent that it'll dramatically reduce power and may even make it hard to tune the carbs. Just because it fits and is cheap / readily available does not mean it should be used.

    Hope that helps, keep up the good work.
    Last edited by theVetteman3; 03-13-2020 at 07:02 AM.
    1985 JS550/800 "Pretty Red": Newmiller 800, Rhaas 750 pump conv. [56.3mph gps]
    2009 1100 SJ:
    Kawi 1100 build in progress
    2009 SJ MINT:
    KP steering adaptor, Worx 228 intake, PWR ride plate [47.3mph gps]
    1987 WJ650:
    6M6, JD Intake Grate, 17/20, Coffmans Sizzler [48.5mph gps]
    1994 XiR: 830cc Superstock, PJS side draft, 13/18 swirl [53.7mph gps]
    1995 SJ MINT:
    Worx 205 intake [42.5mph gps]



  10. #30
    PWCToday Regular smokeysevin's Avatar
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    Re: Smokeysevin roll's his own swap adventure (Critical Failure) 1987 JS550 to 750 Bu

    Quote Originally Posted by theVetteman3 View Post
    Regarding the ditching of the ebox components, although interesting and I like your idea of adding lightness (I'm doing that 100000% on my 1100 SJ build), having a case containing and sealing the components is a very good idea. Even if the components themselves are sealed, it provides an extra layer of protection which might be necessary given the hugely wet and moisture-rich environment these things are in. As a proposed solution, I would recommend mounting all of the components in a sealed plastic water tight box. You can get these all over the place. And then pop holes to the exterior with sealed connections. This is what I'm running on the 1100 SJ.
    I am just not sold on the box setup, every one I have seen leaks and then holds water in the case. On something like a cold fusion box the superjet people run you can see when you get moisture in it but the kawasaki boxes are opaque. While I could run something like a pelican case, I am probably just going to run these naked and see how they hold up. That setup works well on the 4 stroke runabouts. Cost wise, if I bork something up because it gets wet, I can get a full replacement setup for $150ish so its not a huge loss.

    The plastic fittings, although crappy looking, actually seal quite well. You can always put dielectric grease on them or silicone for an extra layer of protection. Really the only issue is if guys aren't running leads out thru them, and then they just fill the end with silicone or whatever. I would not trust that solution, I do better ways of capping them off.

    My main issue with the sealed fittings is the choice of materials and that they are not easilly serviceable. To swap the gaskets out you have to remove the plug ends or wires which means cutting in this case. If I were going to keep a stock style setup I would pickup some of those really nice wax racing anodized aluminum bases and just be done with it.

    Oh finally, when the first round of us did these 750 swap skis back in 2010/2011, a lot of us ran stand up 750/800 style ebox cases. These fit easily mounted to the stock firewall location with an adaptor plate.

    Saving weight is good and all, but in building up a good running, hard hitting ski, you need to know where to put your effort. A sealed ebox will give you no issues. What will have a much larger impact on performance is getting either that cylinder set up right, or getting an entirely different one. Just by the color, that's a big pin engine? Big pins have the highest port timing of all the 750s. Great for racing, bad for low end and (in my opinion) conversion skis. The small pin 750 ss/ xi cylinders have enough added low end over a big pin that you'll notice. The 750sx cyl has so much more that you'll be truly shocked. After that, a good pipe. (PJS EX2650, Coffmans, 650 Limited Factory Pipe).
    You are correct it is a big pin engine, for now, this is just going to stay a stock engine. I have a really bad habit of putting way too much time into a build at the expense of actually getting to use it. When it comes time to rebuild (hopefully a few years from now) I will probably swap to a SXR800 cylinder setup or switch to a ported/sx cylinder.

    Having a good cylinder / pipe / good carb jetting combo can overcome an extra 20-30 lbs easily over a crappy set up.
    For the most part I am going this route for space saving and to clean up the engine bay.

    Also word of caution just because a bunch of builds have been running them lately, and I forget what you said you were using, do not use a stock 650 pipe. It will kill your power to the extent that it'll dramatically reduce power and may even make it hard to tune the carbs. Just because it fits and is cheap / readily available does not mean it should be used.

    Currently the pipe is just for mock-up, I picked it up when I picked up the 650 I originally planned to run. I have a line on a pjs 650 pipe but I have expended my allowance jetski parts for a few weeks so that is on hold for now.

    Hope that helps, keep up the good work.
    Thanks, your builds have been really useful and informative.

    Sean

    The older I get, the more I find myself fixing things that I knew I was doing correctly at the time.



    1987 Kawasaki JankyStandup Build
    2004 Kawi-Doo STX-RXT-X Build
    2001 Toyota Tundra Basketcase Build


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