Kawasaki Fuel Sending Unit Rebuild (old style)
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  1. #1
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    Kawasaki Fuel Sending Unit Rebuild (old style)

    I've owned two kawasaki jet skis in the last 10 years and both of them had the fuel sending units stop working electrically. After taking one apart, I think I have found an affordable way to repair these.

    First off the failure mechanism I have seen in these is that fuel leaks into the unit through the rubber mount and attacks the circuit board and you end up with failed solder joints and an open circuit. This is why mine were staying at 7.8k ohms and not changing.

    1. Remove the top most float retaining ring.
    2. Remove the compression ring on the bottom of the rubber mount and push the rubber mount down unto the fuel sending unit being careful not to damage the top float and magnet. The idea is to expose the top circular oval epoxy piece.
    3. Once you see the oval epoxy piece, you are going to break it off. That's right break it clean off preferably near the top of the brass shaft. This is where the resistors are housed for the unit but it is not worth it to break this open and repair it. The circuit board will likely be trash anyways. Once this is done pull off the rubber mount and place it to the side. If yours has a wire screwed to the shaft, remove this as well. Remove the additional retaining rings that were under the rubber mount and discard.
    4. It is hard to tell but the circuit board continues down inside of the brass shaft. Get out your heat gun and point it to the top of the brass shaft. The idea here is to heat the epoxy and pick it out with a small screwdriver. The epoxy will become brittle after applying enough heat. After getting the majority of the epoxy out, grab some needle nose pliers and pull the circuit board out of the shaft.
    5. The board will be covered with a black heat shrink. Remove this. You will see some some small glass pieces soldered to the circuit board. These are reed switches. Take your multimeter, set it to continuity and place the meter leads on both sides of one of the reed switches. Now take a magnet and place it on the reed switch. You should see/hear continuity. If not the reed switch is open and it will need to be replaced. You can find these on the digikey website. Repeat this for every reed switch.
    6. Once the reeds are all working, we are going to solder 1/4 watt resistors to the back of the board on each reed lead. Digikey is also a good place for these as well as your local electronics store. There should be just enough lead visible from the reed switches to get a good connection. Solder these resistors as close to the board as possible. The reeds are glass and fragile. Be careful not to break these while working on the board. Lay down a towel to help cushion any blows to the reeds. The top most reed switch resistor is 510 ohm, 2nd is 820 ohm, 3rd is 1.6k and the bottom is 5.1k. If you have the older style analog gauge, your resistors will be different. I don't have those values. Maybe someone on the forum can help with those.
    7. Once this is done, solder a small wire from the bottom of the bottom most resistor and run it to the top. Solder another wire from the top of the top most resistor and run it to the top. Give enough wire lead to ensure it sticks out of the top of the completed unit as these will be your new feed wires to the old plug.
    8. You should have just enough clearance to shove the circuit board back into the brass shaft. I didn't bother to apply heat shrink back on my board. You can do that if you like but you may run into issues with space and may have to go down to 1/8 watt resistors.
    9. Swap your meter to ohms and connect it the new wires we just soldered on. Move the circuit board into the brass shaft until you get 7.8k with it right side up and close to zero ohms with it upside down. This will tell you that you have it positioned correctly. Next check each individual reed switch by moving the floats up one by one. You should see your meter change with each one. If not you still do not have it positioned correctly or you have developed a solder issue with one of the new resistors. This can be finicky but stay patient.
    10. Once you are sure it is positioned correctly, mix up some JB-Weld and apply it the top of and inside the brass shaft epoxying the circuit board and the wires in place. Let dry.
    11. Place the top float retaining ring back in place and then slide the wires through the the rubber mount and push it back in place. Secure the rubber mount on the bottom with a hose clamp were the compression clamp was removed. Get this pretty tight as it will be responsible for holding it all together.
    12. Lastly, fill the void left in the top of the rubber mount with silicone and let dry.
    13. Solder or wire nut the new wires to the old plug wires and reinstall the fuel sender and enjoy being able to see your fuel level once again.
    14. I think this whole process took me about an hour of work minus the dry times and approximately $7 in parts.
    Last edited by tdlunsfo; 03-18-2019 at 09:28 PM.

  2. #2
    PWCToday Newbie
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    Re: Kawasaki Fuel Sending Unit Rebuild (old style)

    Hope this helps someone. These new sending units were super expensive.

  3. #3
    Attention ***** PWCToday.com Is My Home Away From Home JonnyX2's Avatar
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    Re: Kawasaki Fuel Sending Unit Rebuild (old style)

    Thanks for the tutorial writeup, that is some great info.
    Quote Originally Posted by Firebird A/C&Heating View Post
    OMG.....Rules for 550 vintage ski class...550 ski riders do not conform to any kind of rules. That is why you are riding a 550 ski in the first place. Rules suck....
    PS...the rule book will be in my 550 pump
    Quote Originally Posted by WB1994
    Listen , stop your cryin' , its only an X2.

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