2006 Yamaha FX Cruiser HO (second) rebuild
pxctoday

» Log in

User Name:

Password:

Not a member yet?
Register Now!

» Find OEM Parts

» Jobs

» wallpapers

Page 1 of 6 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 56
  1. #1
    PWCToday Newbie
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    royersford pa
    Age
    50
    Posts
    42

    2006 Yamaha FX Cruiser HO (second) rebuild

    This will be a long thread and I will post additional pictures later. The story starts in July 2014. I was in the market for a turnkey package and found a pair of 2006 Yamaha FX Cruiser HO Waverunners with Load Rite trailer. The PO insisted they had only been used in the fresh water rivers in southern New Jersey (that should have been my first clue, right?). I inspected them best I could with my relatively inexperienced eyes and hands, and made the purchase. First 2 summers were fine, they performed well and I maintained them well. In the summer 2016, we were on summer vacation down the shore and were lucky to have secured a vacation home with a dock. A friend had taken the ski out and flipped it. Unfortunately, he flipped it back over CCW, but it started Ok and he returned to the dock normally. Then someone else took it the ski out and (I suspect) hit a wave just right, causing water that had seeped into the fuel injector pan to be sucked into cylinder #1 intake, causing a hydrolock. He reported that it was running "just fine and then suddenly stopped running". His sister was on the other ski and (slowly, luckily) towed the broken ski back to the dock. At the time we didn't know about the hydrolock. Back at the dock later that afternoon, we tried to start it and of course the crank wouldn't turn. Thinking it might be a low battery, we took it a local auto shop to have it tested. It tested perfectly, so back to the ski, we removed spark plugs. cylinder #4, ok. #3, ok. #2, ok. #1...hmm that doesn't look good. metal all over the place. Luckily, my brother had caught the waverunner flipping bug, and had just spent a couple years buying, fixing, and selling a dozen or so skis. So he took the victim to his shop. We removed the engine and upon removing the oil pan, copious amounts of metal pieces fell out, along with parts of the piston, rings, etc. Upon further inspection, the conn rod was bent, and had apparently punctured a hole in the case. Over the course of the next few months, with the help of the local machine shop, he re-sleeved cylinder #1, repaired the minor damage to the head, repaired the small puncture in the case, tested the crank for spec, and started to rebuild. New conn rods, pistons, rings, bearings, valves, and --- magic, it runs. We took it out on the river and slowly broke it in. Low RPMs at first, inspected everything, then ran it up. It ran very smoothly, in fact, better than its twin. Took it out again about a week later and it ran fine for 90 minute or so. Then upon returning to the dock it sputtered, barely making it back. Next day it started fine, so we didn't know what to think. Few weeks later out again, and it again ran fine for 30 minutes and then stalled out. had to be towed back to the dock. Took it to a local PWC shop and found low compression on cylinder #1. Sat on it for a bit, thinking what do to. Several weeks later, the bad ski was taking down the shore for vacation. Again, it started and ran fine for 30-40 minutes and then sputtered and stalled. Realizing someone was amiss, it sat at the dock for the rest of the week and then - wait for it.... TOWED back to the ramp to head home. Unfortunately, it was towed a bit faster than spec, and (as we learned later) water made its way back up through the exhaust system into cylinders 2, 3, 4. The following week I took the pair down the shore, hoping to spend some time diagnosing the bad ski. I turned it over on Sunday night and it felt a little sluggish. Thinking the battery was low on charge (again), and let it sit for a few days in the hot summer sun, slow charging the battery. Towards the end of the week, tried to start it, and nothing. It was stuck. I popped the pan off and checked the intakes and saw corrosion...not good.


    So back to the shop, engine out, and realized what had happened. Had to punch the 3 stuck pistons out, rings were completely stuck in place. Ironically, the first accident involved Cylinder #1, but this time, #1 was completely clean. The PWC shop quoted me a ridiculous estimate for repair, so I packed everything up and brought it home. The engine was literally in pieces with bags of parts. The head and valves were covered with a thin layer of salt water corrosion as well as the cylinders.

    I had never rebuilt a waverunner engine before, but am an avid DIY'er and was trained as an engineer. so, what the hell, the engine was already broken, how much worse could it get!?!

    I removed all the valves, labeled and inspected them, storing in egg cartons. Cleaned the valves with a brass wire wheel and then lightly with sandpaper while immersed in water. Amazing how clean they came out, almost like new.

    The cylinder was mostly ok with some minor corrosion which was easily cleaned. Since there was no mechanical damage, most of the work involved cleaning existing parts. Used a hone to clear the minor corrosion off the cylinder wall, and left the recommended crosshatch pattern.

    Order 4 new pistons (just to keep everything consistent), rings sets, and complete gasket set, and started reassembling the engine. Luckily, from the first rebuild, my brother had the correct Yamaha Service Manual, which is an absolute requirement. Once I had the new parts, I installed the rings on the pistons, installed the pistons in the cylinders, which were now cleaned and honed properly. Connected the pistons to the crank, closed the case, and placed the pan. Now, to the head...

    Reinstalled the newly cleaned valves, cleaned the intake and exhaust chambers, reinstalled and head, and torqued everything to spec.

    Now at this point, we still did not know conclusively what caused the original stalling issue, but suspected that the new aluminum added to the head around cylinder #1's valves had broken in and changed the valve adjustment, causing loss of compression. After installing the head, cams, and timing chain, it was time to check the cam gap.

    and BINGO...the two exhaust valves on cylinder #1, which were using .130mm and .175mm hot cams were tight, very tight in fact. After moving the .130mm puck to the valve with the .175mm, puck the clearance was in spec. Then I replaced the .175mm with a .125mm, and the valve clearance was in spec. We believe, based on this, that the aluminum work on the head needed some time to settle after being heated up during break-in. The original valve clearance was computed based on cold, post machine shop work....lesson learned. For one valve, it was .5mm difference, which of course would cause the exhaust valves to stay partially open, leading the compression loss. Now after double-checking all valve clearance was in range, time to close everything up.

    Installed the cam cover, reduction gear cover, stator cover, oil reservoir, exhaust pipes, double/triple checking everything against the service manual, torquing all bolts to spec, etc.

    Did run into some issues with missing parts. I think the PWC shop was expecting to do the repair work themselves, instead of me taking the ski back, so some of the parts that came off at the early stages of disassembly were missing. They had nicely packaged all the engine parts in plastic bags and cardboard boxes, and most of the parts/bolts in plastic bags; but the bolts associated with the first stage is disassembly were missing. So after a couple trips to the shop, all parts were found. Th oil separator box was damaged in the tear-down and had to be replaced. Luckily, the shop had one laying around from another dead ski.

    So at this point, the engine is reassembled per Yamaha spec and ready to drop in. Since this is the first engine rebuild I have done, I was very careful to double/triple check all steps, must have gone through the service manual 10 times already!

    Not wanting to have to remove the engine from the ski after reinstall, I checked the compression. It's showing 125 +/- 5 psi in each cylinder which is lower than I would expect and lower than the required min. 164 psi shown in the manual. After researching and asking around, supposedly the compression should come up to spec once the engine is running for a bit and warm. Makes sense, the valves have to settle in, etc.

    The next step is to install the engine into the ski, connect the wiring harness, etc. and see if she starts. Luckily, there's a twin ski to refer to in case we run into questions. We're going to siphon the old fuel out, since it's been over a year (almost 2) sitting. Also, I've picked up 2 oil filters, and will run it for a bit and immediately change the filter. My brother suggested cutting the oil filter open and inspect what's there for a clue to what's been cleaned out of the engine. Good idea!

    Here are some pictures from the start of the project:


    This is what I started with.....

    here are the bad pistons, that were replaced.... rings were literally encased in the grooves, wouldn't budge, tried many solvents and sonic.

    dirty head...

    Valves before (right) and after (left). [electric tape on the stem to protect it from drill clamp used to spin it while cleaning it on brass wire wheel]

    head in the process of being cleaned
    Last edited by mlebied; 02-16-2019 at 01:19 AM.

  2. #2
    PWCToday Newbie
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    royersford pa
    Age
    50
    Posts
    42

    Re: 2006 Yamaha FX Cruiser HO (second) rebuild


  3. #3
    PWCToday Newbie jeffpat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Newburgh, IN
    Posts
    45

    Re: 2006 Yamaha FX Cruiser HO (second) rebuild

    Very interesting thread! I can't wait to hear how it turns out.

  4. #4
    PWCToday.com Is My Home Away From Home Myself's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Arkansas
    Age
    44
    Posts
    6,293

    Re: 2006 Yamaha FX Cruiser HO (second) rebuild

    I want to see the missing pics! I've been slowly piecing together the same ski with also busted block, sleeved cylinder, etc.
    http://www.facebook.com/twinlakesjetskirepair

    '89 Kawi 650SX 42.4 GPS
    +3" stock pipe, ported ex. manifold, drilled waterbox, blueprinted pump, Ocean Pro ride plate

    '99 Yama GP1200 65U 61.8 GPS
    ported cylinders, matched cases, milled head, blueprinted pump, long ride plate

    '96 Seadoo HX 717 53.13 GPS
    light porting, massaged cases, lightened flywheel, port matched manifolds, Rossier pipe, stubby pump cone

  5. #5
    PWCToday Newbie
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    royersford pa
    Age
    50
    Posts
    42

    Re: 2006 Yamaha FX Cruiser HO (second) rebuild

    Here are pictures from the first accident, when the ski hydrolocked.
    download.png
    IMG_3719.JPG
    IMG_3721.JPG
    IMG_3723.JPG

  6. #6
    PWCToday Newbie
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    royersford pa
    Age
    50
    Posts
    42

    Re: 2006 Yamaha FX Cruiser HO (second) rebuild

    This is Day 1 immediately after purchase...little did I know then the adventure I was in for!!!

    IMG_0768.jpg

  7. #7
    PWCToday Newbie
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    royersford pa
    Age
    50
    Posts
    42

    Re: 2006 Yamaha FX Cruiser HO (second) rebuild

    This is the damage the head caused by the hydrolock. tore it up. That is why the machinist had to fix the aluminum
    IMG_3724.JPG

  8. #8
    PWCToday Newbie
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    royersford pa
    Age
    50
    Posts
    42

    Re: 2006 Yamaha FX Cruiser HO (second) rebuild

    This is what I started with for the second rebuild. All parts in bags and boxes...
    download (6).png
    download (7).png

  9. #9
    PWCToday Newbie
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    royersford pa
    Age
    50
    Posts
    42

    Re: 2006 Yamaha FX Cruiser HO (second) rebuild

    Sorry about the crappy .PNG files. Here are the easier-to-see .JPGs

    This is Day 1, first day I purchased the skis; had I only known then what an adventure this would be!
    IMG_0768.jpg
    This is the vacation rental with the dock, location of the first accident when the machine hydro-locked. Nice crane on the dock made is easier to lift in/out of the water. Oh and I forgot to mention....see the yellow tow rope in the water... the same guy who flipped it also got the tow rope caught up in the intake. When we were removing the ski from the water we broke the lift wire. He's a stand-up guy and drove all around town getting new wire and supplies to fix. So first we had to fix the lift, then remove the tow rope from the intake, then he flipped the ski... yeah, I know...
    IMG_2246.JPG

    After the hydro-lock, we pulled the engine and this is what we found:
    IMG_3719.JPG
    IMG_3720.JPG
    IMG_3721.JPG
    IMG_3722.JPG
    IMG_3723.JPG
    IMG_3724.JPG
    IMG_5070.JPG

  10. #10
    PWCToday Newbie
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    royersford pa
    Age
    50
    Posts
    42

    Re: 2006 Yamaha FX Cruiser HO (second) rebuild

    This is the repair after the first accident.

    50380180330__53040860-0B17-4443-93F1-28801DD007EB.JPG

    IMG_4954.JPG

    You can see the aluminum repair on the had and how is changed the valve seating
    IMG_4953.JPG

    Bottom end ready to assemble
    IMG_4955.JPG

    You can see where the crankcase puncture was repaired
    IMG_7760.JPG

    Cams in and adjusted.
    IMG_7755.JPG
    Last edited by mlebied; 02-16-2019 at 02:17 PM.

Page 1 of 6 123 ... LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v4.2.0